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This marijuana-infused chocolate bar sold in Colorado is scored into 10 pieces, indicating that each square contains a single serving size of 10 mg of THC, the active competent of pot. / Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY

DENVER ?? Three people say they accidentally ate marijuana-laced candy at a county fair here after being told it was just plain chocolate, police say.

One of the three, Jordan Coombs, has already sued the manufacturer and vendor who gave it to them, saying he got so sick he had to be hospitalized.

Coombs said that on Aug. 3, he ate several pieces of Full Melt chocolate at the Denver County Fair, which he was attending with his family. Within minutes, he felt so ill he had to leave the fair and then began vomiting in his car on the way to the hospital, according to the lawsuit filed against Full Melt and its manufacturer, LivWell of Denver.

"I felt like I was having a heart attack," Coombs told KDVR-TV in Denver. "I was really, really hallucinating."

In his suit, Coombs said the vendor repeatedly told him the chocolates contained no marijuana.

Denver police confirmed Thursday that they have three reports of people accidentally eating pot chocolates at the fair and say an investigation is ongoing.

The Denver County Fair this year featured a "pot pavilion," but no marijuana was supposed to be actually at the fair. A marijuana-baking competition was held before the fair began.

Edibles have proved popular since recreational marijuana was legalized in Colorado, especially among people who prefer to avoid smoking marijuana. But the rollout in Colorado came with concerns, including a spike in the number of children and pets being treated for accidentally overdosing on pot-infused foods, which include sodas, mints, suckers and gummy bears.

The potency of marijuana edibles gained even more prominence when New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd wrote about a scary experience she had after eating a pot candy bar.

Two Colorado marijuana deaths have also been connected with edibles. In April, a woman was shot in the head by her husband while she was on the phone with 911. The woman had told the dispatcher that her husband was hallucinating and may have consumed a marijuana-infused edible and painkillers. A month before that, a 19-year-old student fell to his death from a hotel balcony after eating six servings of a pot cookie. It's unclear the precise role of marijuana in the two deaths.



Copyright 2014USAToday

Read the original story: Colo. fairgoers say they were given pot candy

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